Written Speech Examples

Writing your speech is one of the most difficult tasks to do, especially if you have never written anything like it before or you have never done it in the past.

Sometimes all we need to do is just ask someone to write it for us, right?

That is easy and quick.

However, what if there is no one around to write it for you or nobody knows how to do it either?

Then, you are in big trouble. That is why it is very important to know how to write your own speech.

In writing your own speech, you don’t only get to know your material better, but you also have to familiarize it along the way, so when it’s time to memorize, it will not be that hard for you, because you already know your speech inside and out.

So how do you properly format your speech and write it in an organized and systematic way?

Here is a simple format that you can follow. All you need to do is fill it out and that’s it, no more, no less!

A written speech has three different parts namely the introduction, the body, and the conclusion.

The introduction has four different elements namely; hook, thesis statement, purpose and the overview of the main points. These elements are vital in captivating your audience.

The body needs three key points or ideas. Even if you have 10 different ideas that you want to say in your speech, all you need to write are the three main ideas only.

More than three would be too much for the audience to digest.

You can deliver another speech another time to continue the other ideas if you wish to, but the three would be enough to get your message to the audience.

In the conclusion, just repeat your thesis statement and quickly summarize your speech. No need to be lengthy, make it short, simple and memorable for your audience.

PARTS OF THE WRITTEN SPEECH

A. THE INTRODUCTION

Usually written in one paragraph only, this first part of the speech aims to arouse the attention of the audience, present the main idea (or thesis) and the purpose of the speech, and give an overview of the main points of the speech.

1st Paragraph: Introduction

Example

An apple a day keeps the doctor away. One of the best ways to become healthy is to eat an apple every day. Although exercise plays a great role in our health, eating an apple every day could supplement the necessary nutrients that our body needs to restore its full potential to become healthy. Allow me to explain how an apple could prevent cancer and why it is excellent at dental care and prevents heart diseases.

The introduction consists of the following parts:

1. Hook

This statement grabs the audience’s attention. It intrigues, draws in, and motivates the audience to keep on listening to the speech.

Some commonly used attention-grabbing techniques are the following:

  • Telling an anecdote
  • Citing a quotation
  • Asking rhetorical or thought-provoking questions
  • Sharing some background information
  • Giving a riddle or puzzle

Example:

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”

2.  Thesis statement

This sentence states the central idea of the speech.

Example:

“The best way to become healthy is to eat an apple every day.”

3. Purpose

This reveals the goal of the speech. It explains how the audience can benefit from listening to the speech.

Example:

“Although exercise plays a great role for a healthy body, eating an apple every day could supplement the necessary nutrients that our body needs to restore its full potential to becoming healthy.”

4. Overview of the main points

This provides the audience with a brief overview of the main points that the speech will tackle.

It gives the audience an idea of the flow of the speech.

Example:

“Allow me to explain how eating an apple everyday could prevent cancer, excellent at dental care and prevents heart diseases.”

B. THE BODY

Following the introduction is the body of the speech. The body explains, develops, and supports the thesis statement using details, evidence (e.g., statistics, testimony), and examples. It is typically composed of three paragraphs.

2nd Paragraph: Body  – 1st main idea

3rd Paragraph: Body -2nd main idea

4th Paragraph: Body -3rd main idea

Each paragraph has a topic sentence (main idea) and several supporting sentences.

To link one paragraph to the next, you can use transitions. These words or phrases show relationships between ideas and ensure a smooth flow from one point to the next.

These words or phrases show relationships between ideas and ensure a smooth flow from one point to the next.

Here are some examples of transitions:

To add an idea

  • In addition
  • moreover
  • further
  • also

To show the similarity

  • Similarly
  • likewise
  • in the same way
  • in like manner

To contrast

  • On the other hand
  • however
  • but
  • on the contrary

To illustrate

  • For example
  • specifically
  • in particular
  • notably

To emphasize

  • More importantly
  • above all
  • indeed
  • in fact

Example

Apple prevents cancer. According to study, lead researcher Francis Raul, the research director of the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research in Strasbourg, France, apple prevents cancer through the phytonutrient content, including kaempferol and quercetin, chemicals found in apples. Apples show up a specific and irrefutable capacity to diminish lung cancer and direct its spread in case it develops.

In addition, Apple is excellent at dental care. When you eat an apple, it cleans your teeth and your gums. Besides, it decreases the rate of cavities in the teeth. Eating an apple has fiber that cleanses the teeth, while the antibacterial properties of this fruit keep the bacteria and viruses from body infections. Apples also reinforce the discharge of saliva, which reduces the development of bacteria in your mouth.

Moreover, Apple prevents heart diseases. Apples lower the level of cholesterol in the body, making it a solid protective instrument against cardiovascular infections. Truly “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” The antioxidant property of apples decreases the oxidation of fats, called lipid peroxidation, and neutralizes triglycerides and different fats found in the blood vessels that exert dangerous pressure.

C. THE CONCLUSION

This is the last part of the speech. The conclusion reiterates the thesis statement and summarizes the main ideas covered in the body of the speech. It also contains a final, memorable statement

(E.g., quote, metaphor, advice, challenge or call to action) that provides closure or helps the audience remember the speech.

5th Paragraph: Conclusion

  • Reiterate the thesis statement:
  • Summarize the main ideas: 
  • Final and memorable statement: 

Example

The best way to become healthy is to eat an apple every day. Apple prevents cancer, it is excellent at dental care and prevents heart diseases. If you want to live an awesome healthy life, having a wonderful career, remember the beginning of time when there was an apple that gave life to people and saved their lives, you should keep this in your mind and never forget that an apple a day keeps the doctor away.

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